8 Places to See Red Squirrels in the UK / Red Squirrel Week

Red squirrel

Despite being one of the nation’s most beloved native species, red squirrels are still rare in the wild. But conservation efforts are helping to revive their numbers – aided by events like Red Squirrel Week in late September.

Autumn is the best time to spot red squirrels. With fewer leaves on the trees you can see them begin to gather food from the woodland floor for the long winter.

There are plenty of places where you can appreciate ‘sciurus vulgaris’ in the wild, many of which are surrounded by green ‘buffer zones’ to keep grey squirrels at bay.

So if you’re after the perfect autumn walk with some wonderful wildlife, take a look at the best places to spot red squirrels in the UK…

1. Brownsea Island, Dorset

red squirrel feeding

The coastal waters of Dorset provide a great defence against grey squirrels, allowing a large native population of red squirrels to thrive in the wild at this National Trust protected island.

About 250 red squirrels live on Brownsea, making it one of the most populated red squirrel homes in the UK. Its short distance from the Dorset shore in Poole harbour, makes it one of the most scenic and spectacular too!

2. Dalbeattie Forest, Dumfries and Galloway

red squirrel eating

Scotland’s preservation efforts have seen the red squirrel population thrive, with around 75% of the UK’s total native species now living north of the border in Dumfries and Galloway.

There are loads of places to spot red squirrels in Scotland, but the first official trail in southern Scotland at Dalbeattie is one of the most lovely. Here you will find one of the 7stanes mountain biking centres, offering a perfect selection of trails for an active exploration of the red squirrel population.

For a more relaxing time, wander the 90,000 acre Queensberry Estate and grand Victorian Gardens at Drumlanrig Castle and Country Estate.

3. Plas Newydd, Anglesey

squirrel

Views over the Menai Strait and Snowdonia are perfect settings for admiring the local red squirrel population at the beautiful Plas Newydd country house and gardens in Anglesey.

The property and grounds offer plenty of places to walk through the woods and parkland, with benches located throughout.

Originally six squirrels were introduced to Plas Newydd in 2008, but that figure now stands at over 100. They have even crossed the Menai Strait (reds are known to be very good swimmers!).

4. The Isle of Wight

squirrel

The coastal barrier of the Isle of Wight has allowed a beautiful haven for red squirrels to thrive, and a visit to the beautiful Isle allows you to appreciate the reds in stunning natural surroundings.

The Isle’s old railway lines were converted into the Red Squirrel Trail in 2003. The trail runs from Cowes in the north through Newport, Shanklin and Sandown taking in woodlands, wetlands and plenty more in-between.

The Alverstone Mead Nature Reserve is one of the best places to catch sight of red squirrels along the route. Located mid-way down the Isle, it offers a hide so you can appreciate the native red squirrels as they go about their business.

Other Locations:

5. The Snaizeholme Red Squirrel Trail in the Yorkshire Dales offers a viewing area in the Widdale Red Squirrel Reserve.

6. Both Whinlatter Forest Park in Keswick and Aira Force offer lovely places for viewing the resident red squirrels in Cumbria.

7. Kielder Water & Forest Park in Northumberland offers a safe haven for ospreys and salmon as well as red squirrels. The Castle Visitor Centre has a red squirrel room and a red squirrel hide nearby too.

8. Enjoy Formby Red Squirrel Walk where you can explore and spot native red squirrels in beautiful woodland surrounding Formby in Merseyside.

nature infographic

Take a look at our Nature Infographic to see what other wildlife can be seen at this time of the year in the UK, and you can click on the links to search for holiday cottages nearby too!

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