Discover the heart of Wales on St Dwynwen’s Day – the Welsh St Valentine

You may not have heard of St Dwynwen, but Sunday 25th January is St Dwynwen’s Day, and all over Wales the Welsh patron saint of lovers is celebrated. The story is one of romantic celtic legend dating back to the 5th century. Dwynwen was the prettiest of the Welsh king of Powys’ daughters – all twenty four of them! She fell in love with a man called Maelon, but as she was already promised to another, could not marry him. She prayed to god to help forget him and an angel granted her wishes by giving her a magic potion. To show her thanks Dynwen devoted her life to god and helping other lovers.

This Valentine’s Day, take inspiration from Dynwen and look to Wales for a truly romantic break. With wild and beautiful scenery; stunning walks, and fine food, it’s the ideal destination to cosy up in front of a roaring fire at the end of the day.

Follow in the footsteps of Dwynwen to Anglesey

Holy Island, near Holyhead, Anglesey,

Holy Island, near Holyhead, Anglesey,

To continue the story, Dwynwen spent the rest of her life on Llanddyn Island in Anglesey. The remains of the church she set up are still there and have long been a place of pilgrimage. Legend has it the church well can predict the strength of your relationship so star crossed lovers be warned! Llanddyn is not quite an island and is easily reached from the Newborough Warren National Nature Reserve.

Walking through pine forest, sand dunes and across soft white sand make this a dream destination. Soaking up sublime views across the water to the Llŷn Peninsular and spotting the once endangered red squirrels in the forest make this relatively secret spot extra special. Don’t leave Anglesey without exploring further – the pretty town and castle at Beaumaris are not to be missed.

Find a dune of your own in the Gower

Rhossili Bay, Gower

Rhossili Bay, Gower

If pristine white sandy beaches are your thing, the Gower is the destination for you. The first place in Wales to be designated an area of outstanding natural beauty; it has accolades and admirers aplenty. TV programmes such as Huw Edwards’ BBC production ‘The History of Wales’ have featured the varied coastal habitats and birdlife. There are numerous blue flag beaches and in 2013 the magnificent 3 mile sweep of sand at Rhossili Bay was named Europe’s third best beach.

The Gower offers natural beauty and space by the bucket load so it will just be the two of you. Discover miles of footpaths and cycle routes, over 80 ancient monuments and some of the best surf in Wales. And at the end of the day you just need to look up to enjoy the famous Gower dark starry skies. Sigh.

Go off Grid in the Wye Valley

Chepstow Castle on the River Wye

Beautiful scenery on the River Wye

Now if you and your loved one really want to get away from it all – and that means away from mobile reception – the Wye Valley in Mid Wales is the place to go. The area has been charming writers and artists for centuries with the poet William Wordsworth and the artist JMW Turner particular fans.

These days the Wye Valley remains as unspoilt and enchanting as ever. The Lower Wye Valley has been an AONB for 40 years and the whole length of the river Wye is the first in Britain to be designated a site of special scientific interest. If you do want some distraction from each other’s company, this region is also a fantastic destination for an active break. Hiking, mountain biking, rock climbing, canoeing and kayaking and horse riding are all on offer here.

Discover the different sides to Snowdonia

Sunrise on Snowdonia

Snowdonia National Park features the largest mountain in England and Wales and some of the best hiking and ruggedly romantic outdoor scenery in the UK. But it’s not all about high craggy peaks because it also boasts some of the best coastline in Wales, the stunning Llŷn Peninsula. This crooked finger of land is unmistakeable on a map and exceptional for its coves, headlands, beaches and bays. The villages of Abersoch, Llanbedrog and Nefyn are especially charming.

Once you’ve bagged the mountain (and taking the train does count), don’t miss Portmeirion a truly remarkable romantic location. This quirky private village is like a slice of the Mediterranean, all the more beguiling for its juxtaposition against this magnificent Welsh region.

Find a romantic ruin like Carew Castle

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Carew Castle

From abandoned abbeys to crumbling castles, Wales really has this one covered! Wales is the castle capital of Europe with some of the world’s finest castles and inspiring landmarks. There are over 600 of them beautifully illustrating Welsh history from roman times to the rich landowners’ follies of the 19th century.

Magnificent Carew Castle is well matched to its stunning waterside location in beautiful Pembrokeshire. The castle’s history spans 2000 years and the site incorporates an impressive 11th century Celtic cross and the only restored Tidal Mill in Wales. Carew is close to one of Wales’ prettiest and cosiest seaside towns Tenby. So after immersing yourselves in history and legend, you can come back to present day with a fish supper for two or an ice cream on the sands.

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