The UK’s best TV filming locations

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Ted on set of ‘The Village’

With so many great dramas, comedies and adaptations hitting our screens over the last few years, the UK is now awash with interesting and beautiful TV filming locations for us all to visit. Although not all of them are available to tour directly, they still make great holiday locations where you can soak in the atmosphere, feel and aesthetics of your favourite TV programmes. But with so many to choose from, and each with their own visitation limitations and restriction, how will you ever decide on which ones to visit? Well don’t worry, we’ve picked out some of the most famous, beautiful and interesting TV filming location in the UK to help you make up your mind. So here you are, five of the best TV filming locations to visit in the UK:

Downton Abbey – Highclere Castle

First on the list is probably the most famous. Downton Abbey has been a revelation not only in the UK, but also in America where its popularity has exceeded expectations. The show is revered for its accurate historical costume and setting, and critically acclaimed for its realistic representation of social relations in the Edwardian era, and now you can visit the abbey itself. Whilst many of the indoor scenes are filmed in specially constructed studio sets, the outdoor shots of the Abbey are filmed at Highclere Castle in Berkshire, the seat of the Earl of Carnarvon. You can visit the castle most days of the year, and since the show has attracted considerable tourist attention.

If Highclere Castle isn’t enough for you, you can also visit the village of Bampton in Oxfordshire, which is the setting for Downton Village. There is a scheduled tour of the village, or if you prefer you can walk around at your leisure and experience the setting for some of the major plot developments in the show. You can also get access to some of the closed off filming locations and see the Crawley House, Downton Hospital and St Mary’s Church.

Sherlock: The Hound of the Baskervilles – Hound Tor and Dewer’s Hollow

Hound Tor is the site of a deserted Medieval village on Bodmin Moor, and was the inspiration for Arthur Conan Doyle’s story The Hound of the Baskervilles. It’s fitting, then, that when the BBC came to adapt the story for the new series of Sherlock that they decided to film some of it there. The location has a history of being used as a TV location, being featured in Doctor Who in the 1970s and The Sontaran Experiment. This historical and archaeological landmark lies within the rugged woodland of Bodmin Moor, and offers beautiful views across its expanse.

Scenes for this episode were also filmed in Three Bears Cave in Forest Fawr Country Park near Cardiff, which was used to represent Dewer’s Hollow. Again a rugged and traditionally British woodland, this provided the dark eerie backdrop for the sighting of the hound, and has also been used in various other BBC TV programmes, such as Torchwood and Merlin. The woodland expanse of the country park is a beautiful walking holiday destination, which also allows you to take in some TV history whilst you’re at it!

Jamaica Inn – Cornwall

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The BBC remake of Jamaica Inn divided opinion, but whatever you think of the shows recent foray onto our screens, Jamaica Inn remains one of the defining novels in history. Although the TV programme itself was filmed on a number of locations, including Cornwall and Kirkby Lonsdale in Cumbria, fans of the show, book or film adaptations can still visit the famous Jamaica Inn itself, from Daphne Du Maurier took the name of her novel – in fact, the Inn is now so famous it has been given Grade II listing status by English Heritage. Located in the middle of Bodmin Moor, the inn has been on the site since the 18th century, when it was used a resting house for smugglers and pirates in the area. Because of this interesting history, it has also been named one of the most haunted places in the UK.

Regardless of this connection with the novel and various TV and film adaptations, the Inn as a beautiful and historic site in its own right, and the nearby village of Bolventor and the surrounding moorland are typical of the rugged and sublime north Cornish landscape.

Doc Martin – Port Isaac

Nestled on the north coast of Cornwall, the small fishing village of Port Isaac has found fame in the last ten years as the filming location of Doc Martin. Called Port Wenn in the show, all the exterior scenes are filmed in the village, and can be visited all year round. Many of the interior scenes were also shot in the village, but in a converted barn on a local farm, which you can also visit. The village has a history as a TV filming location, having previously been the location of Poldark in 1970s, which is due to make a comeback on our screens next year. As well as a must for fans of the show, this picturesque fishing village is a great holiday spot regardless of its TV associations.

Broadchurch – Dorset

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Slightly less cheerful coastal comings and goings took place in ITV’s drama series Broadchurch. The serial made good use of Dorset’s stunning coastline to tell a gripping tale of the dark secrets underlying a seemingly idyllic community. Thankfully, while the script (and the titular location) was a work of fiction, the beautiful landscape on England’s south coast is far from, with breath-taking landscapes, stunning scenic vistas and warm welcomes aplenty.

The success of Broadchurch has already prompted an increase in screen tourism to the area, but thanks to the abundance of tranquil beauty in Dorset we’re fairly sure that you won’t notice the increased numbers. Of course that may chance when they screen series 2!

Doctor Who – Cardiff

Doctor Who is known for inspiring serious levels of fandom, and its filming locations around Cardiff have become the stuff of legend. Although you can’t get access to any of the sets, you can take an unofficial tour or use the tour app to discover and visit the filming locations of the show. Cardiff is a great city, with fantastic scenery, architecture and museums, and is a great holiday destination even if you’re not a fan of the Doctor.

Aside from the location featured here, there are a whole host other beautiful, history and rugged TV filming locations which make great holiday destinations. It’s the perfect way to fulfil your TV fandom whilst having a great holiday at the same time. With cottages4You you can do both, staying in self-catering accommodation whilst visiting the famous locations of your favourite TV shows.

Cottage of the Week – Eastcott Farmhouse, Tamar Valley, Cornwall

Nestled in acres of secluded countryside in the glorious Tamar Valley, our new featured property is within easy reach of Devon and Cornwall’s stunning north coast with its numerous beautiful beaches. Sleeps 9. Customer comments include: “Excellent, roomy accommodation in a delightfully tranquil location”, “Lovely house (v clean) and lovely helpful owner.” and “Great location, plenty to do around the area”. Find out more on the property listing on our website.

Celebrate National Picnic Week! 

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In a world where we live our lives increasingly indoors, and where families eat together far less often than they used to, picnics offer the perfect chance to come together and enjoy some al fresco food and drink as well as each other’s company.

It’s also a great bonding opportunity away from the distractions of home and work. Even if the weather isn’t at its best, it can still be a hugely enjoyable and beneficial experience. Equally, if you have a large extended family and not that much space indoors, or if you don’t have a big garden, a picnic can be one of the best ways of relishing being outside spaces.

Taking place this year from June 16-22, National Picnic Week aims to give families the ideal chance to come together over an outdoor meal, with tips, advice, recipes and other information, so that you enjoy the perfect picnic. It encourages people to get outside and find great local al fresco dining sites, and the event has grown hugely over the decade it’s been around.

That’s because, while it may be a hoary old cliché, food really does taste better outdoors! There aren’t many better ways of making the most of the summer.

In the rush to get overseas for holidays and the like, it can be easy to forget how lucky we are in the UK to have a huge range of open areas for picnics, from forests and woodland to Britain’s dramatic coastline, hillsides, fields and meadows. Or how about having a picnic on an island, the grounds of a stately home or in a lovely country park? Your perfect family picnic spot may be closer than you realised.

Of course, like most things, a little preparation is required. As well as planning and making your food with care, you will need to choose your family picnic spot in advance, and give some thought to the decision.

Here are just some ideas. Even if they aren’t close to where you live, they could provide inspiration for the sort of spot you’d like to take your family to.

Country Parks 

In the UK, we are very lucky to have a good number of these. In Wiltshire, for example, the Avon Valley Country Park covers some fifty acres of gorgeous land right by the River Avon, and there’s stacks for grown-ups and children to do. Kids, for instance, will love the youngsters’ assault course and there are some great riverside rambles to do while you work up an appetite and decide where to unfurl your picnic rug.

Another good place is Wellington Country Park, with its 350 stunning acres of Hampshire countryside, not to mention a miniature railway, crazy golf, oversized snakes and ladders game, nature trails and more.

North of the border, Beecraigs Country Park in the Bathgate Hills near Linlithgow makes another idyllic location for a family day out. There are activities from kayaking to archery, a fishery and deer farm as well as a campsite, so you could stay a few days and enjoy not just one but several wonderful al fresco meals.

Still in Scotland, the Glenkiln Sculpture Park in Dumfries and Galloway has six sculptures in its eight miles of land.

Historic Sites 

Rievaulx Abbey

Rievaulx Abbey

Avebury Stone Circle in Wiltshire makes an unusual picnic spot, at Europe’s biggest stone circle, thought to be four thousand years old.

Alternatively, in North Yorkshire the ruined Rievaulx Abbey, surrounded by woodland, dates from medieval times and will give your picnic a unique atmosphere. Or what about picnicking in the grounds of Dorset’s Corfe Castle?

Open spaces

The heather and bracken of Bodmin Moor in Cornwall offer a dramatic backdrop to any outdoor meal, as do the North Pennines, from Northumberland’s Hadrian’s Wall into Cumbria. In Wales, the Clywedog Valley and Trail has seven miles of great walking and you could visit the local lead mines. Or take in the hills, woodland and Iron Age fort of Devil’s Dyke, East Sussex.

Beaches and Islands

Still in Wales, Barafundle Beach in Pembrokeshire is a little known spot, but discover it and you won’t want to leave. For island settings, think about beautiful St Herbert’s, Cumbria, or Dorset’s Brownsea Island, dotted with idyllic picnicking locations.

Stately homes

Ragley Hall in Warwickshire provides a superb family day out, with 400 acres to play in, an adventure playground incorporating a maze, climbing frames and a trampoline. You may want to spread out your picnic rug by the lake, where its’ nice and peaceful, and you may see the odd peacock strutting around!

London 

Finally, if you thought the city was no place for a picnic, think again. Somerset House lets you escape the chaotic capital with a massive courtyard complete with fountains, in front of this glorious eighteenth century palace. Another idea is the gardens next to the Horniman Museum, which have sixteen acres and where there’s always something going on.

With so much to enjoy, what are you waiting for? Pack up your picnic basket this summer and head off to enjoy the best of what the UK has to offer- and don’t forget to capture the moment for your Big Kid Bingo card!

Cottages of the Week – Tamar Valley Cottages, nr. Bude, Cornwall

“Beautiful cottage, with gorgeous interiors and comfortable beds”, “Very clean and tidy…set in an awesome location”, “We had a wonderful stay with all the home comforts would recommend to everyone” are just some of the positive comments that we’ve received on our new Cottages of the Week. Fancy adding your own? Take a look at the property listings below for more info on these four lovely properties in Cornwall’s Tamar Valley…

Top 5 Traffic Free Cycle Routes in the UK

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This year promises to be a momentous year for cycling, not only can we look forward to the Tour de France starting in Britain,  but also the Commonwealth Games promises to be a memorable celebration for many of our cycling superstars. Here at cottages4you we love cycling. A quiet bridleway, the sun beating on your back with the birds and the insects playing the soundtrack, you can’t beat it. There are many great routes across Britain that you can enjoy without having to weave in and out of the traffic; here is a selection of some of our favourites.

1.       The Camel Trail, Cornwall

Arguably the most famous cycle trails in the country, the Camel Trail meanders along the southern edge of the Camel Estuary from Padstow  towards Wadebridge, and for the more adventurous, then on towards Bodmin and Wenfordbridge. The trail follows the line of a disused railway surrounded by the delightful rolling greenery of the beautiful Cornish countryside.  The Camel Estuary itself is absorbing, a huge expanse of sand that disappears daily with the return of the tide. The changing landscape adds to the magic, as the view will in all likelihood have changed dramatically by the time you return. Bicycles are available for hire so if you don’t want to worry about taking your bicycles away on holiday, you can pick out your ideal ride in Padstow and then you can travel as far as you choose along one of the most popular cycle routes in Europe.

2.       The New Forest, Hampshire

Cycling and forests go hand in hand and the sights and sounds of one of Britain’s most famous forests provides the backdrop to some fantastic cycle trails for all of the family. Explore over a 100 miles of forest trails away from the Hampshire roads, starting as short as 3 miles and going up to 21 miles there is plenty of choice to match everyone’s ability. Children will be delighted by the local wildlife, look out for ponies, deer and the unforgettable bright flash of a kingfisher!  Following the gently sloping routes through woodland and surrounding moorland, you will find a landscape is full colour throughout the year. Whether your visit coincides with the bluebells in spring or the golden tones of autumn, cycling is the best way to get to know and fall in love with the New Forest.

3.       The Strawberry Line, Somerset

This traffic free route from Yatton through to the Somerset village of Cheddar, takes its name from the cargo that was carried along this former railway line, taking fruit from the heart of Somerset to the city of Bristol. Today you will still pass the fruit in the fields but at a much more leisurely pace, passing secluded wooded valleys through tunnels and into the Mendips!  This ten mile route is idea for families and you be rewarded at journeys end by the awe inspiring Cheddar Gorge.  One of the most spectacular natural wonders in England, this is the most popular tourist attraction in Somerset.  This limestone gorge is also home to a fascinating network of caves and underground rivers, complete with stalactites and stalagmites!  A visit to Cheddar Gorge is a day out in itself

4.       Dolgellau to Barmouth, North Wales

Otherwise known as the Mawddach Trail, the ten mile riverside route from the delightful  Dolgellau to Barmouth lies at the foothills of the western flank of Snowdonia. The route itself is not encumbered by any steep inclines, but enjoys one for the most spectacular settings for any cycle pathway in the country.  Like so many of our treasured traffic free routes, this trail follows the line of a former railway on its journey beside the river Mawddach towards the estuary beyond. The views are truly breath taking; with mountains on one side and on the other side sea, it is easy to understand why this route is so highly regarded by cyclists and walkers alike. With such close proximity to the estuary remember to take your binoculars to view the multiplicity of wading birds that make this beautiful spot their temporary home, and who could blame them!

5.       Tissington Trail, Derbyshire

Open for the past 43 years, the Tissington Trail is a 13 mile route that links Ashbourne  with Parsley Hay in the Peak District National Park. It has quickly established itself as one of the premier cycle paths in the country, enjoying special views across the haunting Derbyshire landscape. Like many on our ‘favourites list’ the Tissington Trail is ideal because by in large there are no steep hills to worry about. Renowned for its moorland, the Peak District makes a lasting impression and the Tissington Trail offers visitors great views of the rolling hills and dales that draw people back year after year. To enjoy the trail at its best, perhaps plan a visit during the summer months when the hillsides are at their greenest and the butterflies provide the company along a bridleway that is suitable for cyclists of all ages.

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Britain’s Best Winter Walks – part 1

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The Peak District: perfect for dusting off the cobwebs

The advent of the New Year signals the beginning of millions of resolutions across the nation, doubtless many of them to include good intentions for a healthier lifestyle.  There cannot be many more invigorating ways to greet the New Year whilst embarking on a more active 2014 than to enjoy a winter walk in the beautiful British countryside. This is the perfect opportunity maybe to ‘dust away a few cobwebs’ whilst getting away this winter to explore some of the most spectacular scenery in Europe.  Here are some great options for winter walking in 2014.

Walking in Cornwall – Holywell Bay to Porthtowan

Coastal walking in winter can be dramatic and perhaps nowhere are they more spectacular than in Cornwall. The mesmerising winter swell produces an impressive demonstration of nature’s unrelenting pounding of the Cornish Atlantic coast. Whether it be a crystalline blue winter’s day or a breezy afternoon, walkers (and surfers!) are drawn to one of the most enigmatic stretches of coast in the country. Holywell Bay with its famous Gull Rocks lies just to the south of Newquay on the north Cornwall coast. The walk following the coastal path south to Porthtowan passes delightful coves, expansive beaches and imposing cliffs and takes about 5 hours. The route will take you through Perranporth, St Agnes and the emblematic Wheal Coates, a former tin mine which looks down on this majestic coastline. This historic landmark has come to symbolise ‘Kernow’ and man’s essential link to land and sea. With a plethora of great pubs along the way, there is plenty of opportunity to ‘rest’ on this popular winter walk.

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Walking in South Wales  –  Rhossili Bay

The Gower peninsula is an area of outstanding natural beauty and like its Cornish cousin the coastline on ‘The Gower’ is unforgettable. This ancient terrain is blessed with natural good looks and is also dotted with Iron Age and Norman monuments to explore in an area that has been treasured for centuries. A great way to take in this fabulous vista is to walk from Worms Head along the coast and then into a circular route around Rhossili Bay. This eight mile route provides some fantastic vantage points that on a clear day will allow you to glimpse the North Devon coast. The rugged countryside is bordered by a large beach at Rhossili Bay providing an opportunity to follow the tideline as part of your journey across some of the most delightful scenery in South Wales.

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Walking in Scotland – Loch Morar

Scotland is synonymous with walking and the famed Munro’s and Corbett’s are of course will trodden. If you are looking for something not quite as strenuous whilst equally picturesque, then Loch Morar is a great option for a memorable winter walk. This part of Scotland is considered a paradise for walkers, with elevated views of some of the most stunning Scottish mountains including Ben Nevis and across the water towards the Hebrides. One of the most scenic and popular routes is the 5 mile route along the loch to Tarbet. With a snow capped backdrop against the still, mirror-like waters and on a crisp winter’s day, the views are simply breathtaking. The wild landscape provides a variety of habits to a fascinating array of wildlife. Look out for otters, roe deer and even sea eagles, which can be seen fishing for salmon!

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Walking in the Peak District – Eastern Moors

The stillness across the frozen Peak District moorland transports the soul into the sense of another world (if not another century). The landscaping is awe-inspiring, whilst haunting at the same time.  The central location of the Peak District National Park makes it eminently accessible and perfect for a walking short break. To get a real sense of wilderness and the essential raw beauty of the Peaks, the Eastern Moors is offers varied range of vistas to immerse yourself during a winter moorland walk.  The circular route from Curbar Gap, through Froggat, White Edges and then back to Curbar Gap, takes in some of the most strikingly rugged parts of the Peak District. Expansive moorland home to timid red deer offers vantage points across Derwent Valley and on to the heartland of the Peak District.

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Walking in the Cotswolds –  Winchcombe

Perhaps there is nowhere that best exemplifies the essence of England’s green and pleasant land than the rolling Cotswolds. Home to the quintessential English village, during the winter months the landscape takes on a magical, almost ethereal flavour as the morning and early evening mists hang over timeless Cotswold valleys. The attractive gentle inclines offer an extensive variety of footpaths and bridleways across historic sites, rivers and past tempting old Inns!  Winchcombe which lies at the heart of the Cotswolds is a great starting point for a variety of walks around some of the most beautiful and historic landscapes in the area.  Many options encompass parts of the Cotwolds Way and you can choose from leisurely two mile routes around Sudeley Castle to more challenging hikes from Winchombe to Hailes, taking in great views of the Malverns and the Vale of Evesham. With the early winter nights make sure you plan your journey allowing for plenty of daylight to complete your walk. What better way than to round off your winter hike than coming home to light your woodburner in your cosy Cotswolds cottage!

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Festive Late Deals

If your most desired Christmas gift is a place to relax, unwind and entertain guests that won’t break the bank then you’re in luck; you can save 35% on all the properties featured below for 7 night breaks from 21 December.

Whether you fancy a rural hideaway in the Highlands, or a coastal cottage for all the family, we’re sure you’ll find it below. There’s only one offer available at each property so if you want to escape for Christmas you’ll have to be quick!

Truro – City of Lights

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The spectacular ‘City of Lights’ procession in Truro marks that city’s official lead up to Christmas. As the temperature dropped and the rain mercifully held off, we dropped by to take in the sights and sounds of this year’s celebration themed ‘expect the unexpected’. The procession is an annual celebration with a Celtic flavour that heralds the approach of the festive season. The cobbled streets of the Cornish capital are lit up by paper lanterns, some small but others are huge shaped in the form of all kinds of magical ‘creatures’. This is a very popular event in Cornwall and the streets of one of Britain’s smallest cities were packed, lining the route sometimes five deep onto the pavements.

There was a real sense of anticipation in the city, a family feel to proceedings with excited children pondering what type of creatures they were likely to see this year. They were not disappointed, the lanterns were stunning representing weeks if not months of hard work amongst locals in the lead up to this one evening. As the sound of bagpipes and drummers reverberated around a city dominated by its cathedral, suddenly dragons, dinosaurs and even a ballerina lantern lit up what was an unusually cold evening in Truro.  The procession coincided with the switch on of the city’s Christmas lights which added to the magic of an evening which precedes a series of weekly festive markets held in the lead up to Christmas. With the backdrop of imposing cathedral, lit up along with the lanterns and fairy lights, very soon everyone forgot about the cold and thoroughly enjoyed the early dose of Yuletide spirit!

Christmas is a particularly special time of year in Cornwall and the City of Lights festival is one of a number of events in the lead up to the special day. Normally associated with holidays in the summer months, Cornwall is a fantastic location for a short break or maybe week’s holiday over Christmas itself. Devoid of the throngs during July and August, this is a great time of year to explore once of the most naturally beautiful counties in Britain. During November and December the very best of local arts, crafts and of course food provide the focus for markets and celebrations across the county. Truro itself bustles with a wide range of eclectic shops and fine restaurants. Within very easy reach of both the north and south coasts, Truro provides a great base for exploring this part of England’s beautiful South West.

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Our 5 Most Popular Destinations for 2014

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The beautiful Fistral beach

After a fantastic summer, many people are booking early for next year with coastal locations proving to be extremely popular. When the sun is out the UK coast is very hard to beat and people are looking to make sure they secure their favourite spots. With encouraging recent news from the British economy and hopefully more of that long hot sultry weather, 2014 is looking to be a great year for holidaying in the UK. Add to that the prospect of some great events, not least the Commonwealth Games in Glasgow, and it’s clear that this is a great time to be looking at availability for your next UK cottage holiday. To help you we are going to take a look at the 5 most popular booking locations for 2014.

5. Windermere, Lake District

Windermere, situated close to England’s iconic largest lake, features at number 5 on our list. Apart from its majestic elevated position close to the shore of Lake Windermere, the town is well positioned to explore the exquisite natural beauty of the National Park in southern Lakeland. With the bustling resort of Bowness close by as well as attractions such as ‘The World of Beatrix Potter’ and ‘Brockhole’ there is plenty to do in what is one of the most popular holiday destinations in Britain. The lake itself now has a 10mph speed limit adding to the tranquillity of a body of water forged by glaciers thousands of years ago. A great way to enjoy the beautiful surroundings is to take one of the regular boat trips from Bowness to the delightful Ambleside. For those of you intent on enjoying a more energetic holiday, Windemere is a great base for fell walking or mountain biking in and amongst some of the most stunning scenery in Britain.

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4. Totnes, Devon

The idyllic rolling Devonshire countryside on the edge of Dartmoor provides the back drop to the market town of Totnes. This area of outstanding natural beauty is blessed by some of the most delightful rivers in the South West. Totnes itself sits on the estuary of the River Dart, and is eminently accessible to some of the best known beaches in South Devon with Paignton and Torquay both within easy reach. To the north lies the rugged beauty of Dartmoor National Park, famous for its rocky ‘tors’ and of course its ponies. This expansive protected English ‘wilderness’ is fantastic for walking and is dotted with quaint Devon villages and pubs. Totnes itself has a thriving local economy buoyed in large part by an influx of artists offering an eclectic range of arts and crafts. Indeed, Totnes was at the forefront of promoting local business and introduced the ‘Totnes pound’ in 2007. With a Norman Castle, even a local vinery and a great mix of exciting eateries, it is not hard to see why Totnes features at number 4 on our list of popular 2014 locations.

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3. Whitby, North Yorkshire

One of the most iconic seaside ports in Britain, Whitby has retained its popularity as a holiday destination for centuries. Facing the North Sea and located by the River Esk, this charming harbour town enjoys mild winters and relatively warm summers. The historic ruined abbey enjoys fantastic views across a scene which has change little over the years.  The cobbled streets of the ‘old town’ serve to convey the living history of a port which for years has been supported by the fishing industry. These days tourism alongside fishing is the life blood of town reputed to be the home of the best fish and chips in Britain, according to Rick Stein and let’s face it, he should know! This stretch of gorgeous Yorkshire coastline is blessed with a huge beach at Whitby, children will love the miles of golden sand. With Staithes to the north and Robin Hood’s Bay a short distance to the south, Whitby is one of the most popular seaside destinations on the East Coast.

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2. Newquay, Cornwall

When considering a beach holiday many will instinctively think about Newquay on the stunning North Cornish coast. Newquay is probably the busiest resort in Cornwall and really has various ‘guises’ with plenty to offer whatever type of holiday you are looking for. Centrally located it provides a great base for exploring one of the most scenic counties in Britain. With a lively nightlife, there are plenty of bars and restaurants to enjoy well into the early hours. Newquay has several gorgeous beaches enjoying the benefit of great surf with Fistral probably the most famous. The River Gannel separates Newquay from the exquisite Crantock Beach to the south, and a short drive to the north lies the expansive Watergate Bay, another favourite amongst surfers. The area is benefiting from the burgeoning culinary scene in the county and there are some great options for fine dining against the backdrop of the stunning Atlantic coastline. This is one of the quintessential seaside towns in Britain, and it is difficult to envisage that Newquay will be anything other than one of the most popular holiday destinations in the UK for some time to come.

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1. Happisburgh, Norfolk

At the top of our list of ‘hot’ locations for 2014 is Happisburgh on the Norfolk coast. As well as one of the most popular, Happisburgh is one of the oldest places in Britain with the discovery of ancient flints providing the earliest signs of habitation in the country. Consequently Happisburgh is designated as a site of special archaeological importance, but for today’s holidaymaker Happisburgh has all of the accoutrements for that perfect seaside break. With miles of sandy beach to the north and south, this is one of the most delightful coastal villages in East Anglia. An imposing red and white ‘candy’ stripped lighthouse is perhaps Happisburgh’s most famous landmark which looks out across the village and the sand dunes beyond towards the unforgiving North Sea. The ravages of the sea have carved a dramatic coastline, which extends north towards the resorts of Bacton and Mundesley. Why not come and find out why many will be spending their holiday in and around Happisburgh next year!

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Cottage of the Week – The Loft, Downderry

Whether you visit in the height of summer, and gaze over Cornwall’s sparkling blue waters from your balcony, or visit in the cooler months and chart the clouds’ passage over the horizon from the comfort of your bed, The Loft offers the perfect opportunity to marvel at nature in wonderfully relaxing surroundings.

Situated in the lovely little coastal village of Downderry, this compact and contemporary studio loft has panoramic 180-degree views of the sea and the coastline from Rame Head down to Looe Island. Located above the owners’ house, the large glass apex window with a Juliet balcony looking directly out to sea is undoubtedly one of its biggest draws, boasting a wealth of natural light and those incredible views.

Take a look at the property listing on cottages4you to find out more and make a booking.